× Notice! This site is currently being redesigned. Please let us know any feedback on the new design or if you find something incorrect/not working.
× Updated! Computed properties are now sorted by implementation versions.

2005--Erhart-P-Albe-K--Si-C-II

Citation: P. Erhart, and K. Albe (2005), "Analytical potential for atomistic simulations of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide", Physical Review B, 71(3), . DOI: 10.1103/physrevb.71.035211.
Abstract: We present an analytical bond-order potential for silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide that has been optimized by a systematic fitting scheme. The functional form is adopted from a preceding work [Phys. Rev. B 65, 195124 (2002)] and is built on three independently fitted potentials for Si-Si, C-C, and Si-C interaction. For elemental silicon and carbon, the potential perfectly reproduces elastic properties and agrees very well with first-principles results for high-pressure phases. The formation enthalpies of point defects are reasonably reproduced. In the case of silicon stuctural features of the melt agree nicely with data taken from literature. For silicon carbide the dimer as well as the solid phases B1, B2, and B3 were considered. Again, elastic properties are very well reproduced including internal relaxations under shear. Comparison with first-principles data on point defect formation enthalpies shows fair agreement. The successful validation of the potentials for configurations ranging from the molecular to the bulk regime indicates the transferability of the potential model and makes it a good choice for atomistic simulations that sample a large configuration space.

Notes: This entry uses the paper's Si-II interaction, which gives better elastic and thermal properties for elemental silicon.

LAMMPS pair_style tersoff (2005--Erhart-P--Si-C-II--LAMMPS--ipr1)
See Computed Properties
Notes: This file was created and verified by Lucas Hale. The parameter values are identical to the ones in the parameter file used by openKIM model MO_408791041969_001.
File(s):
Date Created: October 5, 2010 | Last updated: April 26, 2019